Norms for the Use of the Cappa Magna
in the United Roman-Ruthenian Church

These norms apply to all Rites.

1. The cappa magna is worn by bishops only. It is worn at solemn functions and as required, according to the norms set forth in the Code of Canon Law and other directives and instructions.

2. It is made according to the prescribed style in Roman purple (bishops and other prelates) or red (cardinals and other prelates entitled to the red habit) without any trim. The cappa magna of the Supreme Pontiff is of the same style, but red. The cappa magna of a bishop or archbishop in a religious order is according to the color of the habit of that religious order.

3. The length of the cappa magna from shoulder to the end of the train for bishops and archbishops is 5 yards. That of cardinals and the Supreme Pontiff is 7 yards.

4. The hood is of the style peculiar to the United Roman-Ruthenian Church, viz., in the style of a monastic cowling with hood. The exterior of the summer hood shall be the same material and color as the cappa magna itself. The exterior of the winter hood shall be white fur, with or without black ermine tips. The lining of both the winter and summer hoods shall be red silk or satin.

5. The summer cappa magna shall be worn during the Summer Half-Year, i.e., from First Vespers of the Ascension through First Vespers of the Feast of Saint Catherine (Nov. 25). The winter cappa magna shall be worn during the Winter Half-Year, i.e., from First Vespers of the Feast of Saint Catherine through First Vespers of the Feast of the Ascension.

6. At First Vespers on the Feast of the Ascension, the winter cappa magna is worn to Vespers. The summer cappa magna is taken after the conclusion of Vespers. If Vespers is not said solemnly, but rather in choir, the winter cappa is worn throughout the office, and the exchange is made after the conclusion of the Office. Similarly, at First Vespers on the Feast of Saint Catherine, the summer cappa magna is worn to Vespers and exchanged for the winter cappa magna afterwards.

7. The train of the cappa magna is worn down and extended only by jurisdictional bishops within their own jurisdiction, or by the seniormost bishop present, e.g., by a bishop celebrating a solemn pontifical mass, regardless of jurisdictional status. All others wear the train curtailed, i.e., folded and attached to the main body of the cappa itself or to the left arm. Only Cardinals, the Governor-General, and the Arch-Chancellor may wear the train down in the presence of the Supreme Pontiff. 

8. If the train of the cappa magna is worn down, then the bishop does not occupy a choir stall, but rather the throne or faldstool.

9. When Solemn Lauds is to be said, the bishop presiding wears the cappa magna throughout Matins, occupying the throne or faldstool. During the singing of the psalms of Lauds, he exchanges the cappa magna for the cope and mitre at the throne or faldstool. Similarly, at Solemn Vespers the bishop presiding wears the cappa magna at the beginning of the office, exchanging it for the cope and mitre during the singing of the psalms.

10. When the cappa magna is worn for a solemn arrival prior to the Holy Mass, or the beginning of or solemn arrival prior to an Office, or another rite requiring liturgical vesture, the cappa magna may be taken again after the Mass, Office, or rite.

11. The Supreme Pontiff uses the cappa magna only at the solemn Divine Offices of Christmas (beginning with Matins of the Vigil of Christmas), the solemn Divine Offices of Ash Wednesday, and during the solemn arrival at liturgy of the dead and penitential liturgy (where it takes the place of the mantum). The Supreme Pontiff always wears the hood over the head when wearing the cappa magna.


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